TEXT CODETEXTE CODE
TITLETITRE
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Or how non-definition leads to the tangible

To think architecture.
To think the built object occupying a space; to think it far from all rules, constraints, habits and reflexes within a strategy of indefinition.
A strategy of absolute, abstract, unfinished – a strategy of things to be still open, still awaiting to be given a use, distanced from trends, styles and times.
Forget design, over-representative of its own condition, to understand a formalisation of space that generates typological and genetical modifications of the site. It is in the respect of this original state of the site, its memory, its history, that we are fundamentally aware that any intervention may be an alteration.
The atmosphere of a space, regardless of its scale, is not only affected by its future constructed reality – built, physical, tangible – but also, be it intentionally or fortuitously, by the interaction of light, sound and smell.
Spaces thus consist of overlays, strata, that are never empty.
The strategy of non-definition borrows a part of these considerations
Non-definition draws on these considerations.
This means that this non-definition strategy will not offer an instant rendering of the occupied space, that is, it will offer a singular, unprecedented interpretation of it, intrinsically transitory or ephemeral.
This scenographic work serves a singular very acute notion of “aprehension”.
INonexistent in any form of architectural terminology, this word assumes its full meaning as the recipient of the built object is occupied to the same extent as the space.
It is not simply a question of forms or materials combined in a mode of composition, but of a journey to be designed, experiences or emotions to be transmitted.
The land, the space invested, is an area that is “available”, useful and usable as a base for dynamic transmission.
To create a context, an environment, an atmosphere.
The shape is not the object. .The space contextualisation goes beyond the element itself. The installation outweighs the design of the tool. Contemporary art supersedes decorative art, “ [...] the atmosphere is not created by the ‘decorated’ but by the objects in use[...] that we sit on, work on, use, wear out and replace.”
The representation of the space inhabited by the object is more important than the object itself while what it shows, what it leads you to think is even more important; the demonstration that decoration only has meaning if it is the emergence of a thought that is complete.
What the inhabited space represents is more important than the object itself. The images suggested. The concepts recalled.
Décor only makes sense if it emerges from thought.
It is essential to incorporate this work into the continuity of a composition, that of a “brain-script” constantly linked to the development of the thinking and culture of an era, a layered work that always has its thickness determined by the breadth (multiplicity?) of experiences proposed.
This work must be inscribed in a narrative structure that of a “brain-script” constantly connected with the evolution of thought and the culture of its time.
A system of layers whose depth depends on the multiplicity of the given experiences.
The planning process, the development scenarios, the management and use of the land, the development of professional structures and the multiplication of lifestyles should lead to a global deliberation on the cultural “state” of production.
The crux of the general housing problem, those issues to affect a majority of people are the consequences of a framework created by the economy.
It is a market issue.
Real estate agents, who refer to symbolic cultural values to justify the relevance of their selling arguments, as used in their advertisements, openly berate architects for imposing their dogma and world vision.
Should architecture, in a caricature of itself, devote itself uniquely to the most prestigious works?
Are there two worlds – that of an architect devoted to the expression of an art and that of another, an unpolished craftsman of an off-the-peg lifestyle?
In a society where temporary, disposable, instant consumption is omnipresent, the constituent parts of our environment are becoming virtualised.
Paradoxically enough, housing still embodies durability, the desire and the duty to last.
We cannot help thinking that real state professionals are those to observe the debate from a distorted or misdirected perspective. It is surely no coincidence that the some of the most desirable housing structures are those reassigned, converted non-residential structures or existing buildings.
The housing market intrinsically favours a proliferation of a model more than revealing the specific identity of each object.
The cultural problem at the centre of a debate in which standards and quality, regulations and rules or typology and identity are often confused. Experimenting with new models is essential.
Housing cannot simply settle for satisfying basic needs but must make “comfort” a recurrent component of its architecture.
In an era when the virtual is radically transforming the dissemination and cultural consumption, the question of housing reflects a breakthrough to be urgently be theorised so that “in the end, the best is the enemy of bad...”

Philippe Meyer

Or how non-definition leads to the tangible

To think architecture.
To think the built object occupying a space; to think it far from all rules, constraints, habits and reflexes within a strategy of indefinition.
A strategy of absolute, abstract, unfinished – a strategy of things to be still open, still awaiting to be given a use, distanced from trends, styles and times.
Forget design, over-representative of its own condition, to understand a formalisation of space that generates typological and genetical modifications of the site. It is in the respect of this original state of the site, its memory, its history, that we are fundamentally aware that any intervention may be an alteration.
The atmosphere of a space, regardless of its scale, is not only affected by its future constructed reality – built, physical, tangible – but also, be it intentionally or fortuitously, by the interaction of light, sound and smell.
Spaces thus consist of overlays, strata, that are never empty.
The strategy of non-definition borrows a part of these considerations
Non-definition draws on these considerations.
This means that this non-definition strategy will not offer an instant rendering of the occupied space, that is, it will offer a singular, unprecedented interpretation of it, intrinsically transitory or ephemeral.
This scenographic work serves a singular very acute notion of “aprehension”.
INonexistent in any form of architectural terminology, this word assumes its full meaning as the recipient of the built object is occupied to the same extent as the space.
It is not simply a question of forms or materials combined in a mode of composition, but of a journey to be designed, experiences or emotions to be transmitted.
The land, the space invested, is an area that is “available”, useful and usable as a base for dynamic transmission.
To create a context, an environment, an atmosphere.
The shape is not the object. .The space contextualisation goes beyond the element itself. The installation outweighs the design of the tool. Contemporary art supersedes decorative art, “ [...] the atmosphere is not created by the ‘decorated’ but by the objects in use[...] that we sit on, work on, use, wear out and replace.”
The representation of the space inhabited by the object is more important than the object itself while what it shows, what it leads you to think is even more important; the demonstration that decoration only has meaning if it is the emergence of a thought that is complete.
What the inhabited space represents is more important than the object itself. The images suggested. The concepts recalled.
Décor only makes sense if it emerges from thought.
It is essential to incorporate this work into the continuity of a composition, that of a “brain-script” constantly linked to the development of the thinking and culture of an era, a layered work that always has its thickness determined by the breadth (multiplicity?) of experiences proposed.
This work must be inscribed in a narrative structure that of a “brain-script” constantly connected with the evolution of thought and the culture of its time.
A system of layers whose depth depends on the multiplicity of the given experiences.
The planning process, the development scenarios, the management and use of the land, the development of professional structures and the multiplication of lifestyles should lead to a global deliberation on the cultural “state” of production.
The crux of the general housing problem, those issues to affect a majority of people are the consequences of a framework created by the economy.
It is a market issue.
Real estate agents, who refer to symbolic cultural values to justify the relevance of their selling arguments, as used in their advertisements, openly berate architects for imposing their dogma and world vision.
Should architecture, in a caricature of itself, devote itself uniquely to the most prestigious works?
Are there two worlds – that of an architect devoted to the expression of an art and that of another, an unpolished craftsman of an off-the-peg lifestyle?
In a society where temporary, disposable, instant consumption is omnipresent, the constituent parts of our environment are becoming virtualised.
Paradoxically enough, housing still embodies durability, the desire and the duty to last.
We cannot help thinking that real state professionals are those to observe the debate from a distorted or misdirected perspective. It is surely no coincidence that the some of the most desirable housing structures are those reassigned, converted non-residential structures or existing buildings.
The housing market intrinsically favours a proliferation of a model more than revealing the specific identity of each object.
The cultural problem at the centre of a debate in which standards and quality, regulations and rules or typology and identity are often confused. Experimenting with new models is essential.
Housing cannot simply settle for satisfying basic needs but must make “comfort” a recurrent component of its architecture.
In an era when the virtual is radically transforming the dissemination and cultural consumption, the question of housing reflects a breakthrough to be urgently be theorised so that “in the end, the best is the enemy of bad...”

Philippe Meyer