DATE
TITLETITRE
TYPE
COUV
THOUGHTFUL ARCHITECTURE

With a portfolio that includes the most varied of architectural typologies, the architect Philippe Meyer doesn't seek to specialise in a particular category of project since, as he tells us, his only specialisation in “in architecture.” As a result, he sees each new challenge as an opportunity to question and reflect on a variety of situations and contexts, allowing him to find the best solution for each proposal.
Despite his architecture practice having been established over ten years ago and all his training having taken place in France, the nerve centre of his operation is now found in Geneva, Switzerland and it is there that most of his work is built. He doesn't like bragging about his projects but, perhaps the one that has had the greatest impact until now was his building for the Faculty of Psychology in Geneva, as a result of its dimensions and the attention it attracted. This project led to a seven-storey building totally
covered by a metallic mesh, which established a contrast with the surrounding pre-existing buildings and created a landmark in the city. Even 50, Philippe Meyer emphasises the idea that no projects are more important than others. He argues that the learning of an architect is something that evolves over the course of their career and that “each new project fits into continuum and belongs, although we may not realise it, to the reflection that precedes and follows it." “The others” are his main source of inspiration, be it through the oeuvre of masters of architecture from the past, or everything in his surroundings. “On another scale, there is also a quest for a sensorial approximation to materials. These are what will imbue a space with character”, he adds.
When we ask him how he defines his work, he replies that this is just like talking about oneself.
For Meyer, architecture is part of the architect and is “determined by his perception, ability to observe and absorb.”

THOUGHTFUL ARCHITECTURE

With a portfolio that includes the most varied of architectural typologies, the architect Philippe Meyer doesn't seek to specialise in a particular category of project since, as he tells us, his only specialisation in “in architecture.” As a result, he sees each new challenge as an opportunity to question and reflect on a variety of situations and contexts, allowing him to find the best solution for each proposal.
Despite his architecture practice having been established over ten years ago and all his training having taken place in France, the nerve centre of his operation is now found in Geneva, Switzerland and it is there that most of his work is built. He doesn't like bragging about his projects but, perhaps the one that has had the greatest impact until now was his building for the Faculty of Psychology in Geneva, as a result of its dimensions and the attention it attracted. This project led to a seven-storey building totally
covered by a metallic mesh, which established a contrast with the surrounding pre-existing buildings and created a landmark in the city. Even 50, Philippe Meyer emphasises the idea that no projects are more important than others. He argues that the learning of an architect is something that evolves over the course of their career and that “each new project fits into continuum and belongs, although we may not realise it, to the reflection that precedes and follows it." “The others” are his main source of inspiration, be it through the oeuvre of masters of architecture from the past, or everything in his surroundings. “On another scale, there is also a quest for a sensorial approximation to materials. These are what will imbue a space with character”, he adds.
When we ask him how he defines his work, he replies that this is just like talking about oneself.
For Meyer, architecture is part of the architect and is “determined by his perception, ability to observe and absorb.”